Give Your Lemon Thyme A Purpose

Did you buy a lemon thyme in the spring plant buying craze? I did.

I imagined how its light acidic note would lift lightly salted veal fillets, how it would serenade steamed cod and transform tomato soups.

I carefully carried the lemon thyme home, gently moved it to a bigger pot, added fresh soil for it to thrive in and watered diligently so that I am now faced with an overflow of lemon thyme that clocks in at about a kilogram of lemon thyme leaves. A bloody kilogram.

This poor plant produced the hell out of it so letting the tiny fragrant leaves go to waste is clearly no option. Neither is making lightly salted veal fillets or steamed cod for 238 people, and my tomato plants resigned (probably just gave up after seeing the lemon thyme) so tomato soup transformations are out of  question.

I give you the solution for this serious first world problem. I give your lemon thyme plant a sense of appreciation and a job well done.

I give you Lemon Thyme Pasta:

lemon thyme pasta

Fry 50 grams of thinly sliced prosciutto or serrano ham, a tbsp sliced red onion and three sliced garlic cloves in a dollop of olive oil over medium heat. Meanwhile, cook your pasta (I used fire roasted pasta which lends a nice smokiness to the dish, but regular pasta is fine too). In a small pan, dry roast 2 tblsp pine nuts until fragrant. Careful you don’t burn them, keep a close eye on them. When the ham has released its fat and the pan is starting to look dry, add a bit more olive oil and the juice of half a lime. Add three big handfuls of roughly chopped arugula – trust me, it wilts down to about a third of the volume. Add as much chopped lemon thyme as you care to use up (two handfuls in my case), salt lightly and pepper generously, add the drained pasta, the pine nuts, mix well, divide onto plates and serve with cold feta cheese to crumble on top. The feta is essential, don’t leave it out! Enjoy and give a little pat of appreciation to your lemon thyme plant.

Advertisements

leave me a note

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s